Tag Archives: Rick Sylvester

Best Movie Stunts of the Year List 1970-1979

 

Here is the list for the Best Movie Stunts for the Decade 1970-1979 as listed in the book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!

1970 – They Call Me Trinitythey_call_me_trinity_poster_02

The Spaghetti Western and Spaghetti Western Comedies were starting to come into their own and a string of “Trinity” films starring Terence Hill and Bud Spencer would arise.  They became worldwide stars and did all their own fighting in their films.  These are great fun!

1971 – The Big Bossbig-boss-lobby

Bruce Lee would become a bonafide sensation after his first film and there really was no one quite like him. He had the skills and a way about him that everyone after him tried to copy.  Martial Arts got it’s very own movie genre after this.

1972 – The Poseidon Adventureposeidon-adventure wallpaper

Another new genre, would be this sub-category inside the action genre, that became the disaster film.  This one has a very good fall into a ballroom skylight done by a non-stuntman at the time, Ernie Orsatti.  He would go on to become a stuntman after this, he found he had a knack for it.

1973 – Live and Let DieLive Boat

James Bond would appear this decade a record 4 times!  This is the first on the list with a speedboat jump over land by Jerry Comeaux of 110 feet, which made it into the Guinness Book of World Records.

1974 – The Man With The Golden Gunman_with_the_golden_gun_stunt

This one had a great car jump stunt that is a breath-taking, “I can’t believe I saw that” …mathematical stunt devised by Raymond McHenry at Cornell University and performed by Bumps Willard.

1975 – The Man Who Would Be Kingman who would be king

Joe Powell would perform a jump from a rope bridge between two ravines 100 feet into a pile of boxes that would lead legendary Director John Huston to say, ” That’s the damnest stunt I’ve ever seen.”

1976 – Gatorgator car

This would be the start of a great collaboration between Hal Needham and Burt Reynolds.  Hal Needham would body double Burt in this film and there’s a nifty car flip at the end of the movie with Hal in the truck bed.

1977 – The Spy Who Loved MeSPY-WHO-LOVED-SKI-1

This is a bond film with one of the most extensive pre-credit sequences than all the previous films and right before they go to the opening song and credits, they have a fantastic ski-stunt by Rick Sylvester right off a mountain and then slowly fall until finally has a parachute open. Really great opening.

1978 – HooperHooper3

Hal Needham directed Burt Reynolds this time in a movie inspired by and about stuntmen! Can’t name just one stunt to highlight in this film as it’s just chocked full of them, but if I had to, A. J. Bakunas has a world record breaking jump from a helicopter into an airbag (232 feet!).

1979 – MoonrakerMoonsky7

BJ Worth and Jake Lombard fight over a parachute in this Bond entry and it’s fun to watch.  I would definitely include all the camera men who had to jump and film the sequence which included 88 jumps over all.

Check out our new Book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 8.23.28 PM

Rick Sylvester and The Spy Who Loved Me

 

Rick Sylvester’s opening ski stunt was shot from the top of Asgard Peak on Baffin Island in Canada. The summit was only accessible by helicopter. A small crew, including Sylvester and second unit director John Glen, traveled there in July 1976, a month before principal photography began. They stayed in the neighboring village of Pangnirtung for 10 days, awaiting the right weather conditions.SPY-WHO-LOVED-SKI-1 Numerous cameras were positioned around the site to capture the moment. All the camera operators felt that they lost sight of the skier as he went sailing off the cliff, all except one camera which stayed with him throughout the stunt. The scene was all uncut. Sylvester’s pay was $30,000. Sylvester was supposedly given an additional bonus when he successfully completed the shot.

This was one of the first pre-credit sequences to really give the audience a gasp. You could hear a pin drop, it was fantastic. The Spy Who Loved Me was directed by Lewis Gilbert for Danjaq.spy loved

Things to look up (go to IMDB):

  • Rick Sylvester
  • The Spy Who Loved Me
  • Danjaq
  • Lewis Gilbert
  • John Glen
  • Albert R. Broccoli
  • Eon Productions
  • Harry Saltzman
  • Dana Broccoli
  • Jacqueline Saltzman
  • John Cork
  • United Artists

History of film companies as defined by Wikipedia: Danjaq – (formerly Danjaq S.A.) is the holding company responsible for the copyright and trademarks to the characters, elements, and other material related to James Bond on screen. It is currently owned and managed by the family of Albert R. Broccoli, the co-initiator of the popular film franchise. Eon Productions, the production company responsible for producing the James Bond films, is a subsidiary of Danjaq.

Danjaq was founded by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman after the release of the first James Bond film Dr. No, in 1962, to ensure all future films in the series. The new company was to be called Danjaq S.A., a combination of Broccoli and Saltzman’s respective wives’ names (Dana Broccoli and Jacqueline Saltzman). Also in 1962 Danjaq began its association with United Artists.

Due to financial difficulties, Saltzman later sold his share of Danjaq to United Artists in 1975. Beginning with 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me, Danjaq began to share half the copyright and interests with United Artists Corporation, which is publicly the case still today, although the copyrights to the 2006 version of Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace (2008), and Skyfall (2012) are shared with the series’ new theatrical distributor, Columbia Pictures.

Some sources, notably John Cork (the author of a number of books about Bond’s film history, and a producer of many documentaries created for the films’ Special Edition DVD releases), claim that Broccoli purchased this 50% stake of Danjaq back from UA in the mid-1980s. It has been further suggested that MGM/UA have an exclusive distribution deal with Danjaq that is far more lucrative than when the shares were originally owned by Broccoli and Saltzman.

Although the trademarks for material related to the Bond films are held by Danjaq, the copyright to the film properties (beginning with Dr. No and aside from the 2006 Casino Royale,Quantum of Solace and Skyfall produced and co-copyrighted with Columbia Pictures) are shared by Danjaq and United Artists Corporation. The trademarks associated with the James Bond books and other non-film publications are held by Ian Fleming Publications.

Two theatrically released James Bond films have been made outside the control of Danjaq, a spoof called Casino Royale (1967) because the rights to that book had been sold prior to the Eon/Danjaq deal, and a serious James Bond film called Never Say Never Again (1983), a remake of the Danjaq film Thunderball; the latter was made possible due to a legal dispute involving Kevin McClory, one of the credited co-writers of Thunderball, who was awarded the film rights to the novel in a 1963 settlement with Ian Fleming.

Check out our new Book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 8.23.28 PM