Tag Archives: Golden Harvest

Michelle Yeoh for Supercop

 

Driving a dirt bike alongside a train before leaping off a ramp directly onto its roof then rolling off as it crashes into the dust below? No big deal. At least for Michelle Yeoh it’s not. Not bad for an actress who – allegedly – hadn’t ridden a motorbike before appearing in the film. Originally, Jackie Chan had planned to use a stunt double for all of Yeoh’s stunts, but after seeing her ability during the action sequences he agreed to let her do all her own stunts.Supercop_003-550w1

Never a trained martial artist, she relied on her dance discipline and her on-set trainers to prepare for her martial arts action scenes. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Dance from the Royal Academy of Dance (London, England). With this in mind she still fought her way to the top in the male-dominated genre of Hong Kong action films, where she has been known for years as the “queen of martial arts”.supercop

There is one scary moment, you can see it during the credits of Supercop (which is really Police Story 3, but the way, but released as Supercop in the US). Michelle falls on the hood of the car driven by Jackie Chan and he catches her. They did several takes of the stunt but in one take she hits the ground and takes a pretty hard tumble, she was alright, but looks quite dangerous on film. Supercop was directed by Stanley Tong for Golden Harvest.supercop policestory3

Things to look up (click on item to go to IMDB page or Website):

  • Michelle Yeoh
  • Jackie Chan
  • Golden Harvest
  • Stanley Tong

Check out our new Book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 8.23.28 PM

Jackie Chan and Police Story

 

This is for several stunts, including an opening sequence featuring a car chase through a shanty town, Chan stopping a double-decker bus with his service revolver and a climactic fight scene in a shopping mall. This final scene earned the film the nickname “Glass Story” by the crew, due to the huge number of panes of sugar glass that were broken. During a stunt in this last scene, in which Chan slides down a pole from several stories up, the lights covering the pole had heated it considerably, resulting in Chan suffering second-degree burns, particularly to his hands, as well as a back injury and dislocation of his pelvis upon landing. Chan holds the Guinness World Record for “Most Stunts By A Living Actor”, which emphasises “no insurance company will underwrite Chan’s productions, in which he performs all his own stunts”.police-story21

I discussed this in the previous win of Jackie Chan’s Stunt team, 1983 Best Movie Stunt, about the way that Jackie Chan works on a film. Edward Tang, the screenwriter for this film and many others, confirmed by saying that he did not write this film the way normal Hollywood screenwriters work. Bey Logan pointed out that in America, the screenwriter has an idea and goes to discuss it with producers and directors prior to production. In this case, Jackie Chan gave Tang a list of things he wanted in the film – a shopping mall, comedy, the village, a bus, etc. – and Tang essentially wrote the rest of the story around these elements. In other words, a Hong Kong screenwriter takes the director’s ideas and works them into the film.police story final

I saw an interview with Chan, where he discussed the stunt of sliding down the pole covered with lights. As with the clock tower stunt from Project A (1983), Chan described his fear at the thought of performing the stunt. However, during the filming of Police Story (1985), there was the added pressure of strict time constraints, as the shopping mall had to be cleaned up and ready for business the following morning. One of Chan’s stuntman gave him a hug and a Buddhist prayer paper, which he put in his trousers before finally performing the stunt. Police Story was directed by Jackie Chan for Golden Harvest.pol06

Things to look up (go to IMDB ):

  • Jackie Chan
  • Golden Harvest
  • Police Story

Check out our new Book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 8.23.28 PM

The Jackie Chan Stunt Team and Project A

 

This movie is a marvel of stunt work, but it’s so hard to separate any one stunt that the award is given to the team as a whole for the most stunt fantastic film of 1983.  This is the time when Jackie started to come into his own.  So many of the films he made during this period is simply mind blowing.  I have no idea how he does what he does.

The stunt at the end, the “hanging from the clock tower” stunt is a homage to Safety Last!. At least three different takes were shot; two are shown during the course of the film, and a third at the end under the credits.  The second take almost cost Jackie his life as he lands directly on his head.  Jackie fills his films with stunts from start to finish but he always seems to try and top himself with a shattering closing stunt.project a clock stunt

The way Jackie works on his films are very different than a lot of filmmakers.  Steven Spielberg for example has everything storyboarded out for a film, every location, every camera angle, every stunt. Jackie will have a line in the script that will read as, “Jackie fights” and then when Jackie gets to the actual set that they will be filming the fight scene, he goes through several days exploring the set for props to fight with, furniture to fight around, and major stunts that he can use from the set.  It’s all created there and then.  The crew and stunt team then can spend weeks filming the sequence to make it just perfect.

The great thing about Jackie Chan is that his process allows for creativity on the spot.  He likes to document everything and so the audience is given access to the process.  He puts a lot of the accidents, stunts and background footage into the credits of his films so we can feel like we are a part of the making of the film and to see how things are done. It really adds an excitement to the whole thing.  At times, my brother and I would replay these credits, more than we would the films!

Project A was directed by Jackie Chan for Golden Harvest.

Check out our new Book, 100 Years of the Best Movie Stunts!Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 8.23.28 PM

Things to look up (go to IMDB):

  • Jackie Chan
  • Project A
  • Golden Harvest

History of stunt terms as defined by Wikipedia: The Jackie Chan Stunt Team, also known as Jackie Chan’s Stuntmen Association is a group of stuntmen and martial artists who work alongside Jackie Chan.

The group originated from the relationships Chan formed in his early starring roles in Hong Kong action movies. Several of his co-stars and stuntmen hired by the film studios began working together regularly. This engendered a familiarity of one another’s skills and abilities and it made sense for them to become a working team. Some of the members had received training at the Peking Opera schools, similar to Chan.project_a_1

By 1983, and the release of the film Project A, the stunt team had become an official organisation of 6 members. The organisation meant that the stuntmen not only received insurance coverage, but also a monthly salary and higher pay. By the time of Police Story 2 in 1988, the team had expanded to around 20 members. This incarnation of the team was disbanded in 1990 and thereafter, individual members were contracted and used on a film by film basis rather than all members remaining on the payroll. This allowed for some new faces, and the return of former members.

The formation of Chan’s team influenced others in the business to follow suit, particularly his former co-stars and “brothers” Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao (their stunt teams known as “Hung Ga Ban” and “Yuen Ga Ban” respectively). Other actors to form their own stunt teams include Lau Kar-leung, Philip Ko, Stanley Tong and Bruce Law. Chan’s stunt team has worked in collaboration with Sammo Hung’s team on films including Thunderbolt and Around the World in 80 Days. A small number of films that Chan produced but did not appear in, or was not involved in at all, have utilised his stunt team. These include The Gold Hunters (1981), Rouge (1988), The Inspector Wears Skirts 2 (1989), Stage Door Johnny (1990) and Angry Ranger (1991).project a too

These are former and current members of Chan’s stunt team. Where possible, the films they have worked on are included:

  • Michael Tse –
  • Andy Kay –
  • Colin Flora – Rumble in the Bronx, Rush Hour 2
  • Brad Allan (Bradley James Allan) – Mr. Nice Guy, Who Am I?, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, Shanghai Noon, The Accidental Spy, Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, New Police Story, Rush Hour 3, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac. Stunt Team Leader. First ever non-Asian member of the JC Team.
  • Paul Andreovski – Mr. Nice Guy, Who Am I?, Shanghai Noon, The Accidental Spy, Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days, The Spy Next Door Chan’s personal boxing coach
  • Andy Owen (Andrew Owen) – Rush Hour 3
  • Andy Long (Andreas Nguyen) – Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac
  • Yamson Domingo – Police Story, Thunderbolt
  • Anthony Carpio (Go Shut-Fung) – Armour of God, Project A Part II, Police Story 2 Miracles, Twin Dragons, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, The Accidental Spy, The Medallion, New Police Story, Rob-B-Hood
  • Chris Chan (Chan Sai-Tang) – Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Miracles, Twin Dragons, City Hunter, Crime Story, The Accidental Spy
  • Chan Man-ching – Dragons Forever, Police Story 3: Supercop, Drunken Master II, Rumble in the Bronx, Thunderbolt, Police Story 4: First Strike, Mr. Nice Guy, Rush Hour, Who Am I?, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, The Accidental Spy, Rob-B-Hood
  • Chan Tat-kwong (Chan Daat-Gong) – Project A, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Dragons Forever, Miracles, Twin Dragons, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, The Medallion, New Police Story, Rob-B-Hood
  • Andy Cheng (Cheng Kai-Chung) – Mr. Nice Guy, Who Am I?, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Rush Hour, Shanghai Noon, Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo
  • Johnny Cheung (Cheung Yiu-Wah) – Dragon Lord, Project A, The Protector, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Police Story 2, Miracles, Twin Dragons, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Police Story 4: First Strike, Rush Hour, Who Am I?, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Around the World in 80 Days, Rob-B-Hood
  • Danny Chow (Chow Yun-kin) – Dragon Lord, Police Story, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Miracles
  • Joe Eigo – The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days
  • Fung Hak-on (Fung Hark-On) – Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow, The Young Master, Winners and Sinners, Heart of Dragon, The Protector, Police Story, Dragons Forever, Miracles, Twin Dragons
  • Hon Chun – Project A Part II, Thunderbolt, Rob-B-Hood
  • Dani Hu (Fok Chan Keung) – The Protector, Police Story
  • Louis Keung (Mak Wai-Cheung) – Heart of the Dragon, Miracles, Police Story 3: Supercop, Thunderbolt, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, The Medallion
  • Benny Lai (Lai Keung-Kuen) – The Young Master, Dragon Lord, Project A, Wheels on Meals, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Dragons Forever, Miracles, Operation Condor, Twin Dragons, Rumble in the Bronx, Thunderbolt, The Accidental Spy, Rush Hour 2
  • Rocky Lai (Lai Keung-Kun) – Project A, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Police Story 2, Miracles, Twin Dragons, Police Story 3: Supercop, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Rumble in the Bronx, Police Story 4: First Strike, Mr. Nice Guy, Who Am I?, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, The Accidental Spy, The Medallion, Rob-B-Hood
  • Sam Wong (Lai Sing-kwong / Wong Ming-Sing) – Project A, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Miracles, Polie Story 3: Supercop, City Hunter, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Rumble in the Bronx, Who Am I?, Rush Hour, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, The Accidental Spy. Stunt Team Leader.
  • Ben Lam (Lam Kwok-Bun) – Heart of Dragon, Police Story, Project A Part II, Police Story 2
  • Chris Li (Lee Kin Sang) – Project A, Police Story, Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Miracles, Twin Dragons, Drunken Master II
  • Lee Chun-kit – Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Miracles
  • Nicky Li (Li Chung-Chi) – Project A, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Miracles, Twin Dragons, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Rumble in the Bronx, Mr. Nice Guy, Rush Hour, Who Am I?, Shanghai Noon, Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, Rob-B-Hood. Stunt Team Leader.
  • Ken Lo (Lo Wai-Kwong) – Project A Part II, Police Story 2, Miracles, Operation Condor, City Hunter, Police Story 3: Supercop, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Police Story 4: First Strike, Who Am I?, Rush Hour, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Gorgeous, Rush Hour 2, Shanghai Knights, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac Also known for working as Chan’s personal bodyguard.
  • Mars (Chiang Wing-fat / Feng Sing) – The Young Master, Dragon Lord, Winners and Sinners, Project A, Wheels on Meals, The Protector, Police Story, Armour of God, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Police Story 2, Miracles, Operation Condor, Police Story 3: Supercop, Twin Dragons, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Police Story 4: First Strike, Rumble in the Bronx, Mr. Nice Guy, Rush Hour, Gorgeous, Jackie Chan: My Stunts, Rush Hour 2, Shanghai Knights, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story. Chan’s best stunt double.
  • Max Huang (Huang You Liang) – Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac
  • Jack Wong (Wong Wai-Leung) – Jackie Chan: My Stunts, The Accidental Spy, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, Rob-B-Hood
  • Pang Hiu-sang – Police Story
  • Frankie Poon (Poon Bin-chung) – Project A, Project A Part II
  • William Tuen (Tuan Wai-Lun) – City Hunter, Police Story 3: Supercop, Crime Story, Drunken Master II, Thunderbolt, Rush Hour, Gorgeous, Rush Hour 2
  • Wan Faat – Snake in the Monkey’s Shadow, Project A, The Protector, Police Story, Project A Part II, Dragons Forever, Police Story 2, Miracles, Operation Condor, Twin Dragons, Crime Story, Drunken Master II
  • Paul Wong (Wong Kwan) – The Young Master, Dragon Lord, Winners and Sinners, The Protector, Police Story
  • Jon Foo (Jonathan Patrick Foo) – The Myth
  • Peng Zhang – Rush Hour 3
  • He Jun (Hoh Gwan) – Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around The World In 80 Days, New Police Story, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, The Spy Next Door, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac
  • Gang Wu (Ng Kong) – Shanghai Noon, Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, Rush Hour 3, The Spy Next Door, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac
  • Park Hyun Jin – Rush Hour 2, The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, Rush Hour 3, The Spy Next Door
  • Lee In Seob – The Tuxedo, Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, Around the World in 80 Days, New Police Story, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, Rush Hour 3, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiac
  • Han Kwan Hua (Han Guan Hua) – Shanghai Knights, The Medallion, New Police Story, Around the World in 80 Days, The Myth, Rob-B-Hood, Rush Hour 3, The Spy Next Door, Armour Of God 3: Chinese Zodiacproject_a_1983

The Big Boss (AKA: Fists Of Fury)

 

Bruce Lee was the first worldwide asian superstar and this was the film that put him in the spotlight.  The highest grossing film in China up to this time, it was also a sensation in the US and all over the world.  Martial Arts became a phenomenon.  Lee didn’t know it, but when he went to China to make this movie, he was already a star because The Green Hornet was released in China as The Kato Show.Bruce Lee Big Boss Fists of Fury

This is somewhat of a surprise as it was another TV show that forced Lee to make Fists of Fury in China.  In 1971 Lee went to Warner Bros. with an idea for a TV Show he called The Warrior about an asian martial arts expert in the wild wild west.  Warner Bros. went forward with the show but without Lee and they hired a caucasian to play the asian in the show and named it Kung Fu.big-boss-03

He was so upset that they went with a caucasian for the role that he went to make a real martial arts film to show Warner Bros what he was capable of.  The rest is cinema history and in the end, Bruce Lee became a worldwide sensation.  Lee also paved the way for the asian stars to come later, like Jackie Chan and many others.

In this film, the martial arts was really revolutionary for the day, although, Lee doesn’t have a fight scene until 45 minutes into the film.  You can definitely see a difference between him and all the other fighters…Bruce Lee sizzles.  He really is electric.  I especially liked the fight scene in front of the icehouse (which is hilarious by the way – unintentionally – when he punches a bad guy in the chest and he flies back through the icehouse wall leaving an exact shape of his body in the wall of wood slats) and the fight scene at the end.  Although, the Big Boss at the end, just doesn’t seem to have even a fraction of the power and strength that Bruce Lee does, but manages to catch Lee off guard several times and slice him up a bit.

Big Boss StuntsFists of Fury (The Big Boss) was directed by Wei Lo for Golden Harvest.

Things to look up (click on item to go to IMDB page or Website):

Bruce Lee
Fists of Fury
Wei Lo
Golden Harvest

History of film companies as defined by Wikipedia:  Orange Sky Golden Harvest is a film production, distribution, and exhibition company based in Hong Kong. It played a major role in becoming the first Chinese film company to successfully enter the western market for an extended period of time, especially with the films of Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. At the same time, it dominated HK box office sales from the 1970s to 1980s. 

Notable names in the company include its founders, the veteran film producers Raymond Chow (鄒文懐) and Leonard Ho (何冠昌). Chow and Ho were executives with Hong Kong’s top studio Shaw Brothers, but left in 1970 to form their own studio. They succeeded by taking a different approach from the highly centralized Shaws model. Golden Harvest contracted with independent producers and gave talent more generous pay and greater creative freedom. Some filmmakers and actors from Shaws defected. But what really put the company on the map was a 1971 deal with soon-to-be martial arts superstar Bruce Lee, after he had turned down the low-paying, standard contract offered him by the Shaws.